Dynamic Vs Static Compression Ratio

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Static Vs. Dynamic Compression Ratio. Dynamic Compression Ratio (DCR) is an important concept in high performance engines. Determining what the compression ratio is after the intake valve closes provides valuable information about how the engine will perform with a particular cam and octane.. Definition: The Compression Ratio (CR) of an engine is the ratio of the cylinder volume compared to …

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Compression Ratio is the ratio of an engine’s cylinder volume vs. its combustion chamber size. Static Compression Ratio numbers are the ones you hear thrown around the most (\

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Compression does not begin until the intake valve closes (IVC). Once IVC is reached, the air fuel mixture starts to compress. The ratio of the cylinder volume at IVC over the volume above the piston at TDC represents the dynamic compression ratio. The DCR is what the air fuel mixture actually “sees” and is what “counts”, not the static CR.

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Compression as an adjective means something is squeezed (in this case it’s air and fuel) Ratio as a noun means something is divided by something else. It is a math term meaning a quotient. There are 2 kinds of Compression Ratios (CR): 1. Static. 2. Dynamic. The most common one everyone talks about is Static CR.

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Discussion Starter · #1 · Mar 26, 2015. Ok so I have been trying to do some research about compression ratio. So I found out that there are two types of compression ratios that should be considered when building an engine. One is static compression ratio (scr) and the second is dynamic compression ratio (dcr).

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Static Compression Ratio : 10.167 Dynamic Compression Ratio: 7.826 Obviously there are still a lot of things that I can do to tweak those numbers however I need to. But my concern is that I’d like to get the dynamic compression ratio up a little bit

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Dynamic vs Static Compression ratio. Reply Reply Author. Discussion. Phil Hill. Original Poster. 433 posts. 246 months. Sunday 4th March 2012. Hi Guys Like many of us on here I’m learing lots from …

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The ratio of the cylinder volume at IVC over the volume above the piston at TDC represents the dynamic compression ratio. The DCR is what the air fuel mixture actually “sees” and is what “counts”, not the static CR. Because DCR is dependent upon IVC, cam specs have as much effect on DCR as does the mechanical specifications of the motor.

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mt-engines wrote: ↑ Wed Sep 08, 2021 7:26 pm So what you are saying is static compression ratio is meaningless? How can you get a dynamic without a static? What if the static ratio is 1.0000000001:1 vs say 18:1 you mean to tell me a simple cam swap will make the two equal in power and brake specifics? Atmospheric pressure can only do so much

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The ratio of the cylinder volume at IVC over the volume above the piston at TDC dictates the dynamic compression ratio.The reduced volume that gets compressed represents your dynamic compression ratio and it is always less than the static compression ratio. In most cases it is up to 2 full points lower. Because it is based on fixed values …

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The higher the octane, the more compression the fuel is able to resist, and the higher the potential compression ratio. As we mentioned before, the dynamic compression ratio is the one that actually happens inside the engine. That’s why, when we talk about the best compression ratio, we should focus on the DCR and not on the static CR. Most …

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the difference between STATIC COMPRESSION RATIO AND DYNAMIC COMPRESSION RATIO is where the piston is in the cylinder when the valves close and the piston can actually start compressing the REMAINING VOLUME IN THE CYLINDER VS the STATIC COMPRESSION THAT ASSUMES THE PISTON STARTS COMPRESSING THE INSTANT IT LEAVES BOTTOM DEAD CENTER AND STARTS …

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The static volume/rev on our 2 liter motor example is 1 liter. .725/1 = .725 or 72.5% VE. On a 1.6 liter motor with .8 l/rev the VE would be 90.06% CR: Compression Ratio SCR: Static Compression Ratio DCR: Dynamic compression rati VE: Volumetric Efficiency

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Compression as an adjective means something is squeezed (in this case it’s air and fuel) Ratio as a noun means something is divided by something else. It is a math term meaning a quotient. There are 2 kinds of Compression Ratios (CR): 1. Static. 2. Dynamic. The most common one everyone talks about is Static CR.

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Dynamic compression ratio (DCR) is a more important factor in determining how well an engine runs and whether it will run OK on pump gas (93 octane or lower). DCR, quite simply, is the static compression ratio after some of it is bled off by the intake valve closing after the piston passes bottom dead center.

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Thermal efficiency is based on trapped compression ratio, not static. However, if we go from 16: to 18:1, and leave the resulting TCR values as they come, we would raise the thermal efficiency from 59.67 to 61.31%. However, raising the compression ratio alters the surface area to volume relationship of the chamber, resulting in greater heat loss.

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Static vs Dynamic Compression Ratio. The compression ratio of engines are of two types: status and dynamic. Static compression ratio (SCR) is a volume of the cylinder when the piston is at full crank. Whereas, dynamic compression ratio (DCR) is a volume of the cylinder measured when the piston is at its lowest crank.

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I will use Larry Madsen’s build (MonsterMach) for my comparisons because mine is so strikingly similar. He has 11:1 STATIC Compression ratio. His advertised duration on his cam is 284* This duration yields an, 8.732:1 Dynamic Compression ratio–and he is getting away with pump gas 91 octane.

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The dynamic compression ratio is normally always less than the static compression ratio because of the reduced effective stroke. This is why camshaft manufacturers recommend increasing the static compression ratio to compensate for the loose of effective compression ratio.

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Static Compression Ratio (SCR) is the ratio most commonly referred to. It is derived from the sweep volume of the cylinder using the full crank stroke (BDC to TDC). Dynamic Compression Ratio, on the other hand, uses the position of the piston at intake valve closing rather than BDC of the crank stroke to determine the sweep volume of the cylinder.

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With this much intake duration the dynamic compression would be only 8.2. Cam intake duration of 280 degrees (advertised) along with appropriate head, piston, deck and gasket numbers to come up with a static of 13:1. Dynamic compression would be 9.9.

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Since the dynamic compression ratio is dependent upon intake valve. closure, cam specs have as much effect on dynamic compression ratio. as does the mechanical specifications of the engine. Dynamic CR is much lower than Static CR. Most performance. street/strip engines have Dynamic CR in the range of 8-8.5:1. With.

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Static and dynamic (or corrected and uncorrected) as well as effective (boost) compression ratios are explained for both two-stroke and four-stroke engines. …

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If a low static compression ratio is used with an aggressive cam (i.e. a late intake valve closing point) then the mixture may end up being \

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The static compression ratio is 10.2: and the dynamic compression ratio is 8.5:1. NA dynamic compression ratio of 8.5:1 is the limit for 93 octane pump gas. How is your valve overlap calculated? The valve overlap must be calculated using the seat to seat time or duration at .004\

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Static vs. Dynamic STATIC V DYNAMIC COMPRESSION RATIOS. things are never as simple as they first appear. The compression ratio quoted in technical specification panels is only part of the story. That compression ratio figure is actually what is referred to as ‘static compression’.

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I was having a debate with a friend of mine about cam/compression combos on turbo motors. My argument was that the amount of boost you can run on a turbo motor depends more on the effective/dynamic compression ratio (taking both compression ratio and intake valve closure timing into account) than it does on simply the static compression ratio (swept volume/combustion chamber volume).

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Static vs dynamic compression Built Motor Discussion. Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club: Friday October 15, 2021

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Came up with a static compression of 8.9/1 and a dynamic ratio of 7.9/1. Will this work for towing using 87 octane gas? 91? I tow about 9k in some ugly conditions, 1st and 2nd gear twisty steep climbs in the California desert summer heat (it’s 112 today..)

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stroker1 wrote:I hope their calculator is better than their pistons!!Hopefully it will be. I can tell you for a fact that changing cams and especially with different lobe separation angles will affect the cranking compression and cylinder pressure of an engine without changing the static compression ratio.

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