Dynamic Compression Ratio With Racing Fuel

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The ratio of the cylinder volume at IVC over the volume above the piston at TDC represents the dynamic compression ratio. The DCR is what the air fuel mixture actually “sees” and is what “counts”, not the static CR. Because DCR is dependent upon IVC, cam specs have as much effect on DCR as does the mechanical specifications of the motor.

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Dynamic compression ratio is what really counts in a racing engine because it determines the actual cylinder pressure. Think of two engines that are identical except for their camshafts. The engine with the shorter camshaft duration will typically have higher dynamic compression at low rpm because the intake valve closes earlier on the …

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Understanding Dynamic Compression Ratio. If the intake valve is open at all there is no compression ratio. Compression does not begin until the intake valve closes; not at bottom dead center which is the physical beginning of the commonly stated compression stroke, but at some point up the bore where the intake valve closes and the piston can actually begin compressing the trapped mass in the …

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Wallace Racing: Dynamic Compression Ratio Calculator calculates your engine’s compression ratio for changes in camshafts, rod length, static compression, boost and altitude. Todays date is 11/12/2021 Calculate Your Dynamic Compression Ratio. Back to Calculators Index

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RB Racing’s Advanced Dynamic Compression Ratio Calculator calculates your engine’s compression ratio for changes in camshafts, rod length, static compression, boost and altitude. RSR Advanced Dynamic Compression Ratio Calculator. ABDC Inlet Closing Figures, Evo Big Twin.

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It is very important to know or predict compression ratio with a high degree of certainty, so appropriate fuel choices can be made. Now that we have low- and medium-octane gasoline, and high-octane E85 ethanol plus racing fuels, it is more important than ever to match compression ratio to the intended application and the fuel that will be burned.

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Major determining factor is the fuel you intend to use. Higher octane fuel is more resistant to detonation. I think in terms of an engine as having three compression ratios…. Static, Dynamic and Effective. 1. Static CR is the mathematical ratio as measured on the assembly bench. Determined by deck, chamber volume, piston notches/dishes (if …

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11.3:1cr but 10 Dynamic compression. The engine I’m currently building has a static compression ratio of 11.3:1. With the cam (CompCams 256H or 20-221-3) I’m about to use, the ‘Dynamic’ compression ratio will end up in the 10:1 range. Calculated cranking compression will be around 200 psi.

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Static compression was set up at 12.5:1 with dynamic compression at 9.3:1. Due to the higher compression ratio, we were unable to run pump gas for our test, but we did use 106 octane leaded race gas. We were able to make significantly more power with a a properly designed and tuned E85 engine!

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This equals 62 degrees. With these inputs, the UEM calculator offered 8.198 or 8.2:1 dynamic compression. The generally accepted conservative estimate is 8.0 to perhaps 8.5:1 dynamic compression ratio for 91 octane pump gas. This tends to be true for older, traditional engines with less effective combustion chambers.

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Measured Compression/Cranking Pressure. Compression can easily be readily measured. Compression is the cranking pressure of the cylinder and is directly related to compression ratio. The equation below gives you the expected compression for an engine with a specific compression ratio (CR). (4) CP = CRe 1.2 (A) – A.

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Going back to our simple heat engine again as a basis, we can say by the use of Methanol we are getting twice the weight of fuel to ignite, at the same time we can increase the compression ratio to a much higher figure thus producing much greater power or force on the piston, and so in fact obtaining a more efficient engine.

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Understanding Dynamic Compression Ratio. If the intake valve is open at all there is no compression ratio. Compression does not begin until the intake valve closes; not at bottom dead center which is the physical beginning of the commonly stated compression stroke, but at some point up the bore where the intake valve closes and the piston can actually begin compressing the trapped mass in the …

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Re: Max dynamic compression on 93 octane? The cam has 255* intake duration and the 52* ABDC is the .050 lift figure. I had no problem runnung 10.75 static compression with .040 piston to head and 93 octane. My concern is running the same 10.75 compression with .080 piston to head instead of the .040 clearance.

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Dynamic compression ratio (DCR) is a more important factor in determining how well an engine runs and whether it will run OK on pump gas (93 octane or lower). DCR, quite simply, is the static compression ratio after some of it is bled off by the intake valve closing after the piston passes bottom dead center.

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I’m running static compression of 9.5:1 and dynamic compression of 8:1 with 91 octane California pump gas and iron heads with no quench, a small duration cam and 34 degrees of total timing. I race it and beat on it in 80-100 degree temps with no detonation.

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2,648 Posts. #2 · May 8, 2009. No- the fuel’s resistance to detonation is dependent upon many factors beyond compression ratio. The design and efficiency of the chamber is a biggie, which is why the late-model LS stuff can run pump gas with higher compression. Small heart-shaped chambers, and a matching-shape dish in the piston has been shown …

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While the performance was good, I did experience some detonation unless I ran octane booster. I am growing tired of an extra 10.00 per tank, and I am wanting to switch to a roller cam (likely solid) which will up my dynamic compression beyond pump gas levels (some combos as high as 8.9-9 DCR) so I am weighing options.

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However, that same 11:1 static compression ratio engine with the radical 259/269 duration camshaft would have a dynamic compression ratio in the neighborhood of 7.5:1, totally acceptable to run on pump gas. General rule of thumb for acceptable dynamic compression ratio to run safely on pump gas is 8:1 maximum for engines with cast iron cylinder …

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Here DCR, VE and effective compression ratio line up. As the motor starts spinning faster and as it starts getting closer to the RPM it was designed to be optimal in the VE should actually start to increase. Let’s say at 4000 RPM this motor is consuming .9 liters of air. Now it’s consuming 10% more air than the dynamic compression ratio.

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The engine is LS3 based, 416ci with a 12.4:1 compression ratio and runs strictly off race gas, it puts out 800 hp. My question is if it would be possible to modify the tune to run off pump 91/93 gas without having to lower the compression ratio or change engine components? It is a deal breaker for me as race gas is $11 per gallon, and at $200 …

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VP’s C14 is a leaded (not for use with catalytic converters!) racing gas with a Motor Octane of 114. Jason said, “We recommended this one for naturally aspirated engines operating at over 8000 RPMs with compression ratios of 14:1 and higher. It’s the spec fuel for NHRA Comp Eliminator, NMRA and NMCA”.

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And the so-called compression ratio — and each engine has its own ratio — refers to just how much of that fuel and air combination the piston compresses. \

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Dynamic Compression Ratio (Will my engine run on pump gas?) Home Dynamic Compression Ratio (DCR) is an important concept in high performance engines. Determining what the compression ratio is after the intake valve closes provides valuable information about how the engine will perform with a particular cam and octane. … Race engines, using …

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Cams determine the actual compression ratio of the engine (or dynamic compression ratio). This is the compression ratio that the engine actuall experiences when running, and it is determined primarily by the timing of the valve events. The static compression ratio, which is what most people refer to when talking about compression ratios …

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Race fuel, on the other hand, at 110 to 118 octane will allow compression ratios of 14.5 to 15:1 if tuned properly. Since E-85 has an effective octane of about 110 we are doing research on what we can build using it, keeping in mind some other components will need to be changed to accommodate the use of alcohol.

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Compression makes horsepower on any fuel. Methanol makes more power by providing more heat. Gasoline at 20,943 BTU’s/lb at 14.7:1 air/fuel ratio by mass equals 0.068 lbs of fuel/lb of air or 1415 BTU’s/lb of air. Methanol at 9,770 BTU’s/lb at 6.4 air/fuel ratio by mass equals 1527 BTU’s/lb of air.

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Maximal. Compare Fuels. Sunoco Maximal is a 116 octane extreme performance leaded racing fuel designed for high revving racing engines with high compression ratios. Maximal’s fast burn rate makes it particularly beneficial in large-bore, large-displacement naturally-aspirated drag racing applications. It has also proven to be very popular in …

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Cranking compression isn’t the be-all end-all of octane tolerance. Ask anyone who’s tryed to tame too much compression by just shoving in a bigger cam. Doesn’t always work. Cranking compression is kind of like a Dynamic Compression indicator. Small cam and low compression can give the same cranking compression as a large cam and high compression.

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