Best Compression Settings For Vocals

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Lead vocals in pop and mainstream music are the centre point of the mix. Compression settings for lead vocals should be as natural sounding as possible.. Because humans are expert listeners, any small unnatural-sounding volume jump or dip will be noticeable and detract from the power of the melody and lyrics.

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Well, here are compression settings and tips which I use to compress vocals. IF you have any setting or technique for finding the perfect vocal compression, add your comment and share that trick to other music producers. Other Useful Articles. Mixing Tip: How To Use Glue Compressor FX Chain; 50 Free VST Plugins For Vocals

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Compression ratios for rock and metal vocals are usually right down the center as far as amount, with 4:1 – 6:1 being my starting point. From there, I’m pushing the input pretty hard, aiming for as much as 10 dB of gain reduction with fast attack and release times. We want these vocals to sound aggressive & energetic. Other Vocal Styles.

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1) Set the starter vocal compression settings. Below I provide some settings you can start with, but ultimately you won’t need them. Set the threshold to 0 dB, your ratio to 5:1, the attack and release as fast as they can go (usually 1 millisecond), and the knee to 1.0. Set the make-up gain to 0 dB (as well as the output gain if you have that).

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Opto compressors, such as the Universal Audio LA-2A, are popular for treating vocals, drums, and bass guitars in pop and rock music, where a larger than life sound is desired. By the same token, the Universal Audio 1176 LN, which as an FET compressor, is one of the most popular of all time for drums, electric guitar, bass and bus compression …

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A good compression setting has a fast attack to catch the stray transient, a quick release so that the compression doesn’t color the sound of the singer, and a low ratio so that when the compressor does go on, it smoothes out the vocals without squashing them. Typical settings may look like this: Threshold: –8dB. Ratio: 1.5:1–2:1. Attack …

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Best Compression Settings for Podcast & Speech You have an idea to connect with the world by explaining certain things or discussing them with people who think alike. It looks simple enough, set on a few mics, put several cameras, and press “record’, but actually, there is more to it.

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Once an audio signal passes the Threshold, the Attack setting tells it how quickly to bring the sound back down by the ratio. With a slower Attack setting, it will allow the louder \

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Best Parallel Compression Plugins For Vocals . Although a stock digital compressor may work, you often want something with a little more character. Below is a list of some of the top compressor plugins that have a more analogue quality.

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Re: Fruity Compressor Settings for Screaming / Growling Vocals (example) Ooo, distortion. I dig it. So, normally a compressor/limiter would be used to control dynamic range so a part is clearly audible throughout the song. These vocals are already fairly squashed because of the distortion effect you used.

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Dressed To Compress: Your Vocal Compression Cheat Sheet. Before we dive into vocal compression settings and how to compress vocals, let’s first conduct a quick debriefing on how a compressor actually works.Trust me, it’ll help later on. Compression limits the dynamic range of the instruments or tracks it is applied to (essentially it makes the louder parts quieter in order to create a …

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Each ratio setting, including the all-buttons-in setting, has a unique character and vocals typically work well with the attack towards the slowest setting and the release towards the quickest setting. See the chart at the end for more descriptions of FET compressors. Workflow Strategies – Pre Compression

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If the compressor has a knee setting, turn this up to make the compression more subtle; Avoid de-esser’s. This is a form of compression that reduces that harshness of sibilant S sounds in the voice. These are great for sung vocals, but sound unnatural on spoken word recordings

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1) Set the starter vocal compression settings. Below I provide some settings you can start with, but ultimately you won’t need them. Set the threshold to 0 dB, your ratio to 5:1, the attack and release as fast as they can go (usually 1 millisecond), and the knee to 1.0. Set the make-up gain to 0 dB (as well as the output gain if you have that).

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How you use vocal compression really depends on the song, genre and recording quality and so it makes it impossible to give you settings that will be perfect every time. It takes time and practise listening to compression to learn what works and what doesn’t.

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Compressor Settings for Mastering, Vocals and Instruments OK, so I’m really trying to get my head around compressor settings – along with my rudimentary practical knowledge about what the settings do. I am just beginning to be able to HEAR changes that are made and the pros/cons of them.

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This post is going to start off by talking about the importance of compression on vocals, then get into the different types of compressors that there are, and finally, the best plugins for vocal compression. The Importance of Compression on Vocals. Your vocals are probably the most important aspect of your recording, yet the hardest to get right.

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This is the best method of not only achieving subtle, natural sounding compression to your vocals, but it will also boost the quality of the recording to sound more like a professional studio. Although it’s the best method for editing female vocals, it is unwise to apply multiple compressors to the entire track .

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As a mix engineer, using sidechain compression on vocals is the technique that I find myself using the most. By sidechaining the vocal and compressing guitars, keys, backing vocals – or even the everything EXCEPT the vocals… You can subtly create more room in the mix for the vocals to cut through.

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When it comes to rock music, there is one particular application of compression that’s vital: the lead vocals. In most cases the vocals are the most important element of the mix. If the vocals sound wrong, the mix will sound wrong. It’s the focal point of the entire song for most listeners.

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Find the setting you like best and then back off half of a decibel or a full decibel. When you EQ other instruments in the mix, this is a good candidate to slightly cut out of other instruments like rhythm guitar or keyboard / synthesizer. It will make more room for the vocals and keep them intelligible. Starting Settings: Start at 5 kHz. It’ll …

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To achieve subtle, natural sounding compression on your vocal it’s best to use multiple compressors throughout the mixing process (this is called ‘serial compression’). Rather than using one heavy compressor with a 10:1 ratio that’s applying 10+ dB of gain reduction, it’s better to use multiple compressors that each chip away at the …

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With tonal compression, the most important part is the attack time. Typically, fast attack times are good for thick and heavy vocals while a slower attack time is good for aggressive vocals that punch through the mix. Here are the basic settings to start with: Threshold: –24dB; Ratio: 1.5:1–2:1; Attack: <1 ms; Release: About 40 ms; Gain …

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So always avoid over compression for any type of vocals. Always go with the below process. Apply – Listen – Tweak And you will find the best version. Rap Vocal Compression Settings ‘Cheat Sheet’ Here is the cheat sheet for rap vocals that you can initially apply and then tweak as per your need. Ratio – 5:1; Threshold – -15dB

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Threshold and ratio determine how much compression is applied, and how aggressive it is. They work best when tweaked together. How To Nail The Perfect Threshold And Ratio: 1.Set the ratio to a moderate setting (~3:1). 2.While listening to your entire mix ( do not solo the vocal ), pull down the threshold until the compressor starts compressing.

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On vocals, I have found that they begin to sound lifeless and over-compressed when compressing more than 6dB. Ratio. The ratio setting on a compressor decides how aggressive the compressor will respond. A higher setting (i.e. 12:1) will compress much more aggressively than a lower setting (i.e. 3:1).

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One of its most popular features is the Overeasy mode — this controls how compression begins to take hold near the threshold, which is great for vocals. You can use it to smooth out sharp attacks or to enhance transient impact. However you use it, you can expect precise, transparent results from the 560A module.

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To use something “in parallel” is when we take a signal (lets use VOCALS as an example here since this tutorial is about Parallel Vocal Compression), and we send it to two places. So lets say your Vocal is routed to a standard Vocal Buss. Thats signal 1. The way we enable ourselves to send a second “parallel” signal is to set up a Send …

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For compressing before the A/D conversion, I use a light touch of compression. 1.5:1 or 2:1 ratio, fast attack (about 5ms) and medium or automatic release. Usually, 3 to 6 db’s of gain reduction with this settings you don’t make the vocals seem squashed. And I turn on the limiter too for those sudden peaks.

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However, a little compression on the way in can help with keeping dynamics even and creating a good vocal sound, and it’s certainly common to compress vocals on input, although perhaps not as much as it once was. Greg talks about what a big fan he is of the 1176 compressor, both for tracking and mixing. He mentions how vocals sound fat and …

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