Audio Compressor Settings Chart

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Compression Chart & Cheat Sheet Compressor: An audio processing device that reduces the dynamic range of a signal or in other words reduces the difference between the softest and loudest part of the signal. The main controls are… Threshold: Where the compressor kicks in and starts to reduce the gain Ratio: What ratio of Gain Reduction is employed (Example – 2:1 will halve the signal above …

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Compression Quicklook Guide – A Useful Table Of Compressor Settings. Following our generic EQ settings, we thought it would be nice to include a generic compressor settings table. These settings were originally posted here. These are by no means fixed rules you must adhere to, but rather good starting points.

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A realy great article which helps a lot in understanding a compressor. In the chart which explains atack and release time, naming of *input and output signal* is inverted either in the text or in the chart. Text: the blue line is the audio outcoming vs. Chart: the blue line is described as input level.

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When applying compression, try these basic compressor settings as a starting point: Start by setting the ratio to the highest value or inf:1. Set the threshold level to 0 dB. Set the attack and release controls to the fastest settings. Lower the threshold level until you see some gain reduction.

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Knee decides how compressor transitions between the compressed non-compressed states of an audio signal. Generally, compressor plugins have two option for Knee – Soft Knee and Hard Knee. With soft knee compressor attacks on the audio signal softly and with hard knee it attacks hardly. Compressor Settings For Vocals

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effect any signal over 100 dB) and we put a sound through the compressor set on 2:1 that’s at 104 dB…what will come out? The answer is 102 dB, because we went 4 dB over our 100 dB threshold and that extra 4 dB change will be compressed to only a 2 dB change because of our 2:1 ratio. 10 Worship Sound Guy’s Compression Cheat Sheet

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Opto compressors tend to color a signal more, and are therefore used for effect. Opto compressors, such as the Universal Audio LA-2A, are popular for treating vocals, drums, and bass guitars in pop and rock music, where a larger than life sound is desired. By the same token, the Universal Audio 1176 LN, which as an FET compressor, is one of the …

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Dressed To Compress: Your Vocal Compression Cheat Sheet. Before we dive into vocal compression settings and how to compress vocals, let’s first conduct a quick debriefing on how a compressor actually works.Trust me, it’ll help later on. Compression limits the dynamic range of the instruments or tracks it is applied to (essentially it makes the louder parts quieter in order to create a …

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The settings all depend on the sound you’re trying to achieve with compression. Plus different compressors react differently. Compression can be tricky but you’re much better off reading up on compression than blindly using these settings. Compression can and will single handedly destroy your mix if you don’t know what you’re doing.

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Ratio tells the compressor how much compression to apply. Mine is set to 4:1, lower ratios will be more subtle. Attack tells the compressor how quickly to start applying compression once the Sensitivity threshold is passed. Since we’re largely trying to catch loud impulse sounds (gunfire, grenades, etc), I recommend setting this fairly low.

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Use the level meters on the compressor to match the output level to the input level. Start with 5dB and adjust from there. Quick Tips. That’s all the main settings covered. Let me give you some general advice for applying compression to a voice recording. If the compressor has a knee setting, turn this up to make the compression more subtle

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This article will help you learn what compression does, how to choose the perfect compressor settings, and some common pitfalls to avoid. But first… What is compression in music? Compression in music is the process of reducing a signal’s dynamic range. Dynamic range is the difference between the loudest and quietest parts of an audio signal.

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Audio Compression Explained. Depending on which compressor you’re using, and whether it’s a hardware unit or a plug-in, there are some common parameters and controls used in audio compression that you should be familiar with. Understanding each of the following controls will allow you to work comfortably with a wide range of compressors.

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When applying compression, try these basic compressor settings as a starting point: Start by setting the ratio to the highest value or inf:1. Set the threshold level to 0 dB. Set the attack and release controls to the fastest settings. Lower the threshold level until you see some gain reduction.

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Reducing 800 Hz takes out the cheap sound of an acoustic guitar as well as reduce the DI sound of plugged in acoustic guitars. 1 – 4 Khz. Boost 1.5 kHz to increase the string sound of the bass guitar. Cut to reduce nasal sound of vocals.. 3 kHz adds attack to most everything. Gives you more punch out of your acoustic guitar chords.

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The original audio that was passing through the compressor will now be compressed according to the signal running into the compressor from the external source. For example, people love to use sidechain compression when mixing their kick and bass together.

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Hot tip: A faster release setting can intensify the ‘pumping’ sound that’s sometimes associated with heavy compression—especially on drums. Audio compression instead of levelling. This also might sound counterintuitive, but sometimes a compressor can’t control very large swings of dynamic range in an uneven performance.

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Set the Volume at a unity gain setting to keep the sound as clean as possible. Blend settings above half-way will work best. This setting will make those two-and-three note chord stabs on the upper strings super-articulate. If your compressor has a tone control, a brighter setting would be appropriate. Clean Sustained Lead. Attack – all the …

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Compression is usually a good idea with hand drums because the drum can produce unpredictable transients. For most hand drums, start with the following settings: Threshold: –6dB. Ratio: 3:1–6:1. Attack: 10–25 ms. Release: 100–300 ms. Gain: Adjust so that the output level matches the input level. You don’t need much added gain.

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Standard compressor settings for rap vocals. Threshold: –5dB. Ratio: 4:1. Attack: <60 ms. Release: About 40 ms. Gain: Add 2dB to allow the compressor to color and thicken the overall sound. You can learn more about mixing rap vocals in general from this helpful article at Pro Audio Files.

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Download the Compression Cheat Sheet so you can take the guesswork out of your mixes. Demystify how to use compression on drums, bass, guitar, vocals, and more – so that you create better mixes with less effort (even in an untreated room at home). DOWNLOAD NOW. *We guarantee 100% privacy.

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My 5 Favorite Compressor Plugins 1. Slate’s FG-Grey (part of their Virtual Bus Compressors package) Slate’s FG-Grey is a souped-up emulation of an SSL G-series bus compressor (perhaps the most iconic mix bus compressor of all time). It’s got a bright, snappy sound that pairs well with most modern genres.

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The ratio settings you choose also depend on the source audio, the other compressor control settings, and the result you’re aiming to achieve. The best approach is to use your ears and meters to determine the right ratio for each sound. There are also general tips to help you find a starting point when setting the compressor ratio.

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To give you an idea of what each setting sounds like, we’ve included audio samples with the fastest and slowest settings for both attack and release. These audio clips apply ~10 dB of gain reduction at a ratio of 4:1 using Logic’s stock FET compressor. Here’s the original audio track for reference: Audio Player.

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Although having the right compressor settings for mix-bus compression is important, you don’t want to be adjusting the settings in the later parts of the mix. The best thing to do is to get a feel for what the mix is going to be about early on, set the bus compressor then, and leave it be. … The best way to grasp the concept of the sound of …

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Audio file size is related to its format, encoder, sample rate, and bitrate. Generally speaking, changing the bitrate can make the audio file smaller, the higher the bitrate, the bigger your size is. Online UniConverter helps change audio bitrate from 320Kbps to 32Kbps with least quality loss.

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Now without compression, this vocal track could be very annoying. Compression sets balance by automatically compressing signals when it reaches a certain level. Some Basic Introduction about Audio Compression. It is important that by applying the suggested settings in this tutorial; you know how a compressor works.

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Just be sure not to overdo limiter settings, as the added compression and eventual distortion can suck the life out of a dynamic mix. Another use for limiters is in a live sound setting, as a fail-safe precaution. If a loud sound occurs (one that would blow everybody’s ears out), this limiter will make sure to control it.

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As useful as a compressor is for live applications, it truly shows its worth in a studio recording scenario. Back in the days of analog tape recording, compressors were typically used to ‘shoehorn’ a dynamic audio signal into a relatively narrow range. This made it possible to fit an inherently dynamic instrument–such as a loud bass or guitar–into the mix, without having it dominate.

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Valve Compression. Valve compressors work in one of the three ways described above, but use valves in the amplifier circuit to get that ‘creamy’ sound. The LA2A, which is an opto compressor, uses valves. How Set Up a Compressor. 1. Whether you’re using a hardware compressor or a plug-in, setting up works the same way.

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